Florian Mayr Pattern

Pattern 4 (Martin) and Pattern 2 (Werner) – 2022
Installation view Characters at Gallery Martin Janda, Vienna.
Transit blanket, chromakey fabric – approx. 60 x 40 cm and 80 x 40 cm

Courtesy Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna
Photographer: kunstdokumentation.com / Manuel Carreon Lopez

Florian Mayr Pattern

Pattern 4 (Martin) and Pattern 2 (Werner) – 2022
Installation view Characters at Gallery Martin Janda, Vienna.
Transit blanket, chromakey fabric – approx. 60 x 40 cm and 80 x 40 cm

Courtesy Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna
Photographer: kunstdokumentation.com / Manuel Carreon Lopez

Florian Mayr Work Hours

Work Hours (blue: installation work for hire; green: independent art practice; white: overall work hours)
Left to right, top to bottom: Bar chart, stacked (Annual hours for work for hire and art practice in 2019, 2020 and 2021.) Line chart (Annual hours for work for hire and art practice, 2016 to 2021, including overall work hours. Record for art practice hours begins when graduating from art school.) Bar chart (Monthly hours for work for hire and art practice June 2021 in relation to image.) Bubble chart (168,5 monthly hours for work for hire and art practice September 2021 in relation to image.) Bubble chart (168,5 monthly hours for work for hire and art practice August 2021 in relation to image.) Pie chart (Quarterly hours for work for hire and art practice in 2019. Record for art practice hours begins when graduating from art school.) Simplified box plot (Hours for work for hire and art practice May to December 2019, including overall work hours.) Dot plot (Monthly hours for work for hire and art practice in 2020.) Bar chart (Monthly hours for work for hire and art practice in June 2019 in relation to image.) Combined pie and bar chart (Total monthly hours in 2021 combined with bar graphs showing the relation between hours spent on work for hire and art practice.) Line chart (Monthly hours for work for hire and art practice in June, July, and August 2021.) Line chart (Monthly hours for work for hire and art practice in August, September and October 2021.)

Installation view Conditions and Frameworks: Infrastructure as Form and Medium at Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 2022.
Acrylic paint, paper, digital c-print – 85 x 265 cm

Florian Mayr Samuel Bich Christopher D’Arcangelo Installation View

CD FM SB – 2022
The installation on the work of Christoper D’Arcangelo contains two copies of the book As yet untitled (CD FM SB) and two framed silver gelatin prints. It shows the current state of the artistic research project.

Installation view Conditions and Frameworks: Infrastructure as Form and Medium at Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 2022.

As yet untitled (CD FM SB) is an artist’s book by Samuel Bich and Florian Mayr based on the diploma thesis CD DA FM: A description of Christopher D’Arcangelo’s works by Florian Mayr from 2014. The book is the first printed and freely accessible systematic review of the artistic work of Christopher D’Arcangelo. The book’s presentation is complemented by two framed works, documents of the March 9, 1978 action at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. In the action, D’Arcangelo takes Thomas Gainsborough’s work Conversation in a park (1740) off the wall, places it on the floor, and replaces it with a text addressed to museum visitors.

Florian Mayr Samuel Bich Christopher D’Arcangelo Installation View

Series I: Work Files, Box A, Fales Library & Special Collection, Collection processed by Lisa Darms with Lawrence Giffin, 2009. CD DA FM: Eine Beschreibung der Arbeiten Christopher D’Arcangelos, S. 429, Foto [1.A.45] Aktion Louvre, Florian Mayr, 2014. Silver gelatin print 16,2 x 24,5 cm, framed, Samuel Bich und Florian Mayr, 2022.
Silver gelatin print, framed – 51,4 x 46,4 cm

nd_d’arcangelodec200b.pdf, S. 37. Sébastien Pluot and Dean Inkster, 2007. Silver gelatin print 27,9 x 21,6 cm, framed, Samuel Bich und Florian Mayr, 2022.
Silver gelatin print, framed – 51,4 x 46,4 cm

Florian Mayr Don’t look at the trees. Look at the fireworks.

Untitled (3) [left] and Untitled (1) [right] – 2021
Installation view at Haus Wien, Vienna.
Acrylic paint, chromakey fabric – 52,5 x 70 cm
Acrylic paint, dye-sub printed PE fabric – 52,5 x 35 cm

Photo: Flavio Palasciano

Florian Mayr Don’t look at the trees. Look at the fireworks.

Untitled (3) [left] und Untitled (1), Untitled (2) [right] – 2021
Installation view at Haus Wien, Vienna.
Acrylic paint, chromakey fabric – 52,5 x 70 cm
Acrylic paint, dye-sub printed PE fabric – 52,5 x 35 cm
Chromakey fabric – 52,5 x 35 cm

Photo: Flavio Palasciano

Untitled (4) [left] and Untitled (5) [right] – 2021
Dye-sub printed PE fabric – 35 x 23,3 cm
Chromakey fabric – 35 x 26,3 cm

Florian Mayr Pattern

Pattern 3 (Sandy) [left] and Pattern 4 (unlabeled) [right] – 2021
Installation view After The Revolution at Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna.
Transit blanket, chromakey fabric, steel – 75 x 140 cm

Florian Mayr Pattern

Pattern 3 (Martin) – 2021
Installation view After The Revolution at Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna.
Transit blanket – 80 x 50 cm

Florian Mayr NCIGGO

No coffee, I gotta go. Okay? – 2019
Installation view Telestretch at Ve.Sch, Kaltenleutgeben (AT).
Steel, chromakey fabric, dye-sub print on PE fabric, acid dyed cotton – 232 x 384 x 15 cm

Photo: Peter Mochi

Florian Mayr NCIGGO

No coffee, I gotta go. Okay? – 2019
Installation view Telestretch at Ve.Sch, Kaltenleutgeben (AT).
Steel, chromakey fabric, dye-sub print on PE fabric, transit blanket – 232 x 864 x 15 cm

Photo: Peter Mochi

Florian Mayr NCIGGO

No coffee, I gotta go. Okay? – 2020
Installation view Hypersurface at Austrian Cultural Forum, London (GB).
Steel, chromakey fabric, dye-sub print on PE fabric, acid dyed cotton – 232 x 384 x 15 cm

Florian Mayr NCIGGO

No coffee, I gotta go. Okay? – 2019
Installation view degree show at Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna.
Steel, chromakey fabric, dye-sub print on PE fabric, acid dyed cotton 232 x 480 x 15 cm

Photo: Philipp Grünewald

Florian Mayr NCIGGO

No coffee, I gotta go. Okay? – 2019
Installation view Master’s degree presentation at Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna.
Steel, chromakey fabric, dye-sub print on PE fabric, transit blanket, acid dyed cotton – 232 x 975 x 15 cm

Photo: Philipp Grünewald

Florian Mayr Display Spezialschule

Exhiption display for Spezialschule für Bildhauerei (Specialist School: The history of the sculpture building of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna)
The stones of Kurzbauergasse (ed. sculpture studios at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna) garden have fulfilled a historic role as silent witnesses of different times as well as the flux of students and all their different realities. Their solid forms have been repeatedly reshaped during the studio’s annual course in stone carving. Their final state lies in being endlessly redefinied. For the exhibition’s display concept Florian Mayr reflected this interpretation of the stones. He indicates their structure and details in pedestals, which serve as a display for the artworks of the show, which in turn deal with different strands of history of the sculpture studios of the Academy. (Text by Pille-Riin Jaik)

Florian Mayr Display Spezialschule

Untitled (Stones) – 2019
Installation view Spezialschule für Bildhauerei at xE Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 2019.
12 exhibition displays: plywood, paper mache – variable dimensions

Photographer: Jennifer Gelardo

Florian Mayr Pattern

Pattern 1 (Martin) [right] and Pattern 2 (Svenja) [left] – 2017
Installation view Tiefe Kirschen at Gallery Lisa Kandlhofer, Vienna.
Transit blanket – 73 x 161 cm and 98 x 164 cm

Florian Mayr Pattern and Wall

Untitled (Wall) with Pattern 2 (Martin) – 2017
Installation view Tiefe Kirschen at Gallery Lisa Kandlhofer, Vienna.
Wall: Wood, chromakey fabric – 365,8 x 243,8 x 10,2 cm

Florian Mayr Work Work Work 1

work work work #1 – 2017
Artist’s booklet (digital C-print, 32 pages, 21,0 x 14,8 cm)

Florian Mayr Workers Jacket

Untitled (Workers Jacket) – 2016
Chromakey fabric – 82 x 157 cm

Florian Mayr On the surface its all illusion

On the surface it‘s all illusion – 2015
Chromakey fabric, object (coated paper mache), video – 100 x 520 x 413 cm

Florian Mayr On the surface its all illusion

On the surface it‘s all illusion – 2015
Chromakey fabric, object (coated paper mache), video – 100 x 520 x 413 cm

Florian Mayr Christopher D‘Arcangelo
Florian Mayr Christopher D‘Arcangelo

CD DA FM (A description of  Christopher D‘Arcangelo’s works) – 2014
Book (728 pages, 27,9 x 21,6 cm)

In 1955 the US-American conceptual artist Christopher D’Arcangelo is born as the first son of the artist Allan and the choreographer Sylvia D’Arcangelo. He is born in New York where, except for a few years, he lives and works until his suicide 1979. Work in the tense atmosphere of art and living produced during his main creative period between 1974 and 1979 valuably contribute to the area of the late conceptual art of the 1970s starting from consistent development and performance.
D’Arcangelo’s substantial involvement finds its expression both within his two main sequences, the action and labor works, as well as in exhibition concepts and publications. Within these he addresses entry requirements and exclusions in arts, whereas D’Arcangelo not only involves artists, but also includes observers of his work. Furthermore social policy and economic considerations are put down within this work, especially due to D’Arcagenlo’s interest in social changes. This striving for change can be found within his works and appears in different ways. Productions of the action work series find their expression within radical performances, which D’Arcangelo took up at different institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. On the contrary the mechanical constructions of the labor works are limited to private spaces of people from the art milieu, like Louise Lawler, amongst others. Productions of this series are group works that were put into different constellations and deal with the relation between art and (wage) labor. As a main part of D’Arcangelo’s ephemeral work has not remained, documentary records are especially valuable and interesting. This is not only due to the transparency of these works from a present-day perspective, but also includes the approach and severity of the documentation by Christopher D’Arcangelo.
The reception of D’Arcangelo’s artistic involvement has decreased since his death and his work has most widely lost attention. Besides the abrupt end through D’Arcangelo’s death this low attention for his work mostly depends on the accessibility, as his legacy has not been refurbished being locked up in a storage room of Allan D’Arcangelo for decades now. Not until the donation of the whole set of works to the Fales Library & Special Collections in New York and the therewith initiated archival reprocessing a suitable approach to D’Arcangelo’s material has been created. To get access to this archive the administrators have established certain requirements. These, on the one hand, enable every person access to the archive on site, but on the other hand ban reproductions, which even includes taking copies or pictures for research purpose.
Precisely this prohibition of reproduction opens interesting ways to approach to D’Arcangelo’s documents, which find their expression within my arts-science thesis. I approach the set of works through the method of description, what finally leads to a chronological listing of D’Arcangelo’s works. My ways of approaching this research and the documentation strategies put into reflexive text are set right before the descriptive part of the thesis. Between an objective description of the works my own subjective graphic interpretation and a narrative part with pictures widen the involvement with Christopher D’Arcangelo.